Fair Use disclaimer

All music presented on this site is shared under the premise of "fair use"; this site is solely intended for the purpose of education and critique. If you are a rights holder to any of the music presented and wish for it to be removed, simply contact me directly and it will be taken down.

Friday, December 27, 2013

THE "5" ROYALES - THEY DON'T KNOW

Hailing from Winston-Salem, NC, The "5" Royales were a VERY important group in the evolution of soul music- their recorded output in the 1950's combined their gospel roots into secular R&B, much in the same way that Ray Charles (more famously) did as well. James Brown acknowledged his debt to the influence of The "5" Royales, going so far as to say he modelled his own Famous Flames on the group, and also recording their song "Think" several times.

The group released a few gospel records in the early 50's as The Royal Sons, but by 1952 they began recording secular music and changed their name to The "5" Royales and continued with more or less the same lineup until 1965. This smouldering hot R&B side was released twice- first on VJ Records in 1961, then again on the Home Of The Blues label in 1962 (the same recording was used for both).

from 1962...

THE "5" ROYALES - THEY DON'T KNOW

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

THE MONKEES - CHRISTMAS IS MY TIME OF YEAR b/w WHITE CHRISTMAS

Christmas arrived early this year, in that I found a copy of this record (that I've been chasing for many years) back last July.

Issued both in 1976 (to the fan club in limited numbers) and again in 1986 (this copy), this single hardly ever turns up for sale because both pressings were so limited, and most people tend to hang onto them. I have no idea where the '86 release was even SOLD, as I was both a Monkees fan and reading Goldmine magazine as a youngster during this era and I never remember seeing it for sale, and certainly have never seen it in any record stores. Perhaps producer Chip Douglas repressed it for the fan club only, I'm simply not sure. I've had both sides of this 45 on a lo-fi bootleg LP for over 20 years, but nothing beats having this copy with the uber-cool picture sleeve showing the fellas in the studio, reunited.

Chip Douglas and (Turtle) Howard Kaylan wrote the song back in 1968, and it was issued as a single by a group calling themselves The Christmas Spirit, which was made up of several Turtles and Linda Ronstadt. While the song was revisited for The Monkees version, it was completely re-arranged in a far superior way for their track, which is pure magic.

The group was unable to use the name Monkees due to legal restrictions, so the record was cleverly released as We Three Monkees. Michael Nesmith chose not to participate, but the rumor mill claims that it's none other than Nez playing pedal steel guitar on both sides. Micky and Davy take turns on the lead vocal, which is heartfelt and lovely, and the song itself is a wonderful thing. What's in the grooves makes it obvious that everyone involved was having a ball when they made the record. Davy takes the lead for a very moving, country flavored version of "White Christmas" on the flip side, which shows how this man could croon with the best of them and how missed he is.

The words written on the back of the picture sleeve, "An expression of friendship and togetherness to make the holidays a little brighter for all of us" couldn't be more spot on.

Whatever it is that you celebrate, I wish you peace, love, and happiness today, tomorrow and everyday.

from 1976...

THE MONKEES - CHRISTMAS IS MY TIME OF YEAR

b/w WHITE CHRISTMAS



Saturday, December 21, 2013

BETTY LLOYD - SNOWFLAKES


(Originally posted 12/24/11)

One of the prettiest, yet little known soul Christmas singles.

I'm not sure if this Betty Lloyd is the same singer who was a member of the east coast girl group The Percells; Thomas Records  was a Chicago label, and this track certainly has an indelible Chicago stamp on it.

The lyrics brilliantly capture the feeling of being alone at Christmas, but without self pity. Oozing with quality, this song should be a holiday standard.

from 1969...

BETTY LLOYD - SNOWFLAKES

Thursday, December 19, 2013

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN - CHRISTMAS SOUNDS b/w DECK FIVE

(originally posted 12/10)

While I don't generally pick favorites, as each year passes this record has gotten deeper and deeper into my soul, and I could probably say that it's my favorite rock n roll Christmas single.

One area that wasn't explored very deeply by US garage bands was the Christmas record; however, Chicago's Saturday's Children were way too sophisticated to be called a garage band.

Here, the band (deeply influenced by the Beatles) melds "Deck The Halls" with Dave Brubeck's jazz standard "Take Five' and turns it into a jazzy, quasi-psychedelic number that I almost guarantee will bring on some holiday cheer. This group had an incredible knack for harmonies, and tackle the tricky 5/4 time signature with ease making for the most hypnotic Christmas record I've ever heard. The other side ("Christmas Sounds") is an exceptional holiday original showcasing their excellent group harmonies and songwriting skill.

I also put together a holiday 'mixtape' this year for Aquarium Drunkard- check it out here!

from 1966...

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN - CHRISTMAS SOUNDS

b/w DECK FIVE

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

JOHNNY MOORE - CALL IT WHAT YOU WANNA (I CALL IT LOVE)

Chicago vocalist Johnny Moore had a powerful, appealing voice and released several great records. For whatever reason, his records charted locally in Chi-town but never made a mark in any other markets. Several of (producer) Jack Daniels' other records were picked up by the then massive Mercury Records family for national distribution, and it's a real head scratcher why they wouldn't have picked up this one.

This excellent track may bear a striking resemblance to The Temptations "(I Know) I'm Losing You", but I certainly don't mind. When a groove hits this hard, it just doesn't matter.

from 1968...

JOHNNY MOORE - CALL IT WHAT YOU WANNA (I CALL IT LOVE)

Saturday, December 14, 2013

CAROLYN FRANKLIN - CHAIN REACTION

Aretha's youngest sister had a chance to WAIL on this record, and in my opinion it's the strongest of all of her solo records (thanks in a big part to the excellent song - written by the great Van McCoy - which is so strong it should have been a hit).

Carolyn's greatest successes were as a songwriter for several Aretha tracks, and she also contributed some superb backing vocals to Aretha records, occasionally with older sister Erma in tow.

Sadly, Carolyn died way too young; she was only 43 when she passed away from breast cancer.

from 1970...

CAROLYN FRANKLIN - CHAIN REACTION


Tuesday, December 10, 2013

THE 3 DEGREES - DRIVIN' ME MAD

 Phew... the close harmonies on this record drive ME mad, in the best possible way!

The 3 Degrees formed in Philadelphia in 1963 and went through a few lineup changes before settling into their hit making mid '70's soul-disco sound. Their early records for Swan feature some of my all-time favorite girl group vocals, and this another Richard Barrett production that takes the Motown blueprint and adds some Philadelphia seasoning to the pot; a recipe which eventually morphed into the very distinctive, string driven (but still rhythmic) Philly soul sound.

from 1966...

THE 3 DEGREES - DRIVIN' ME MAD

Saturday, December 7, 2013

BITS AND PIECES - DID I SCARE YOU

Gorgeous male/ female vocals and a lovely groove highlight this record that seems to be a one off from Bits And Pieces.

If you know any more info about this group, please write!

Yeah, I'm getting much deeper into early to mid '70's soul than I've ever been! With the exception of a few dozen ultra rare '60's 45's that remain on my want list, I think I've exhausted the wellspring of '60's soul sounds (although occasionally I hear something "new" that makes me go hmmmmm)

from 1973...

BITS AND PIECES - DID I SCARE YOU

Monday, December 2, 2013

THE ASCOTS - MISS HEARTBREAKER

The Ascots were a group made up of four singers, three of whom were brothers (Archie, Eddie and Jerome Powell, plus Irving Haywood) from Washington, DC. The group took some serious cues from The Impressions on this record, but the more aggressive style of drumming is pushed to the front of the mix, giving the record a very unique sound.

The harmonies are earthy and gorgeous, and the swinging and propulsive groove are gonna make you feel mighty fine.

from 1964...

THE ASCOTS - MISS HEARTBREAKER

Thursday, November 28, 2013

ARTHUR CONLEY - I'M A LONELY STRANGER b/w WHERE YOU LEAD ME


Georgia born Arthur Conley started recording in 1959 with his group Arthur & The Corvets (whose small handful of singles didn't make much of an impression commercially). In '64, Arthur struck out on his own to cut his solo debut. Otis Redding heard the record and was so impressed that he had Arthur re-record both sides for release on his own Jotis label, which had national distribution.

While it took the Arthur-Otis collaboration two more years to strike gold with the massive "Sweet Soul Music", this brilliant double sider shows that Arthur Conley was equally adept at a deep soul ballad ("I'm A Lonely Stranger") or an uptempo stomper ("Where You Lead Me").

On this day (and every other), I'm most definitely THANKFUL for all those amazing folks (that we celebrate here) who bared their hearts, souls, and talent onto vinyl.

from 1965...

ARTHUR CONLEY -  WHERE YOU LEAD ME

b/w I'M A LONELY STRANGER

Sunday, November 24, 2013

CLAUDE HUEY - STILL LOVE YOU b/w IF YOU"LL BE MY WITNESS

Phew; there's some SERIOUS depth on this record from bay area soul singer Claude Huey. "Still Love You" is a slow burner that takes its time building up in a subtle, understated arrangement, but completely overwhelms the listener with pure soul; a masterful vocal from Mr. Huey. Equally excellent is the groovin' flip side- "If You'll Be My Witness" has a super cool fade in and the kind of bubbling bass line that Bernard Reed was laying down on lots of late 60s-early 70s Chicago soul classics. It's all over in a too-quick 2:02.

The "Osborne" listed as the writer and producer is Jesse Osborne, aka Ozz of Ozz & The Sperlings legend (his "Can You Qualify b/w Daddy Rollin' Stone" is probably my all time fave bay area soul 45). Ozz helped Claude (a lifelong pal) begin a career in music after Claude's time in the Air Force. Claude Huey released 5 singles before calling it quits in 1970 (this was his final release).

from 1970...

CLAUDE HUEY - STILL LOVE YOU

b/w IF YOU"LL BE MY WITNESS

Friday, November 22, 2013

BOBBY HEBB - LOVE, LOVE, LOVE

Nashville born singer-songwriter Bobby Hebb followed up his smash '66 jazzy soul hit "Sunny" with his cover of the country standard "A Satisfied Mind", interpreted with a dash of soul. Probably not the wisest decision in a commercial sense, and in my opinion the flip side is the TRUE gem. "Love, Love, Love" chugs along with a stomping Motown beat, infectious piano and beautifully optimistic lyrics delivered with true conviction by Bobby. Should'a been the a-side, if you ask me!

from 1966...

BOBBY HEBB - LOVE, LOVE, LOVE

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

BIT OF HONEY - HE'S THE ONE b/w LIVE IN MAID

This record seems to be a one off from this group, and I'm assuming that they were from Atlanta, as producer Calvin Arnold was based in Georgia.

Both sides are excellent! "He's The One" is an uptempo number that, while secular, has a bit of a gospel sound. "Live In Maid" slows the tempo and gets funky, funky, FUNKY! The lead singer (whoever she is) has a very sexy, saucy delivery for super results.

from 1970...

BIT OF HONEY - HE'S THE ONE

b/w LIVE IN MAID

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

I have a new 45 RPM single available for pre-order!

Thanks to the success of the "She Came This Way" 45 (sold out in 3 weeks!), we're doing another  Derek See 45! This time around, he's joined by The Gentle Cycle for a new version of "U Line", backed with "Love Is The Plan". Colored vinyl, limited to 200 copies.

USA orders:



International orders: 

Sunday, November 17, 2013

TSU TORONADOES - YOU'RE MINE b/w BACK AFTER THE NEWS

The TSU Toronadoes have the distinction of being the uncredited as the backing of "Tighten Up" by Archie Bell & The Drells. Their name came from Texas State University, and that veritable road kind sport sedan, the Oldsobile Toronado.

This single (cut and released shortly before "Tighten Up") features a gorgeous soul ballad on the a-side, and a super-groovy instrumental on the flip.

from 1967...

THE TSU TORONADOES - YOU'RE MINE

b/w BACK AFTER THE NEWS

Thursday, November 14, 2013

CYMANDE - THE MESSAGE

Didn't think I'd stay away completely, now didja?

I'm still on a massive high from DJ'ing in Seattle @ The Emerald City Soul Club Weekender, two nights in a row. Met tons of cool folks, many of whom have been digging this site for years. It was a righteous time!!!

Cymnade were a group formed in London, made up of folks hailing from Jamaica, Guyana and Saint Vincent; their name is a calypso term for dove; the symbol of peace. Their music is a lovely mixture of island rhythms and steady grooving funk.

This particular song is what it's all about, to me. TOGETHER is where it's at.

from 1972...

CYMANDE - THE MESSAGE

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Aquarium Drunkard presents... A Derek's Daily 45 Mixtape

Aquarium Drunkard is one of the greatest music blogs out there, and I'm pleased as punch to have put together another downloadable "mixtape" for the site. This time, it's all on the psychedelic-garage-freakbeat tip, and it's guaranteed to light up your next party and cause you to get a speeding ticket if you listen to it in the car.

Check it out HERE

Friday, October 11, 2013

Daily 45 salutes JIMI HENDRIX : THE SOUL SESSIONS

My love for the work of Jimi Hendrix is unparalleled; his innovative and ground breaking guitar work set the standard, but it was his songwriting, performing, and charm that extended his appeal beyond musicians. Hendrix was oozing music, and it was evidenced by these early sides, cut before his "discovery", move to London and imminent fame.

The Isley Brothers infectiously intense "Testify" was Jimi Hendrix first released recording session, and with his first guitar solo that was unleashed to the world, the man shows that he meant BUSINESS. He plays his break with a focused intensity that, no matter how many times I've heard it, still snaps my neck in to place in a way that no chiropractor ever could. After his release from the Army/ 101st Airborn in 1962, Seattle born Hendrix settled in Nashville, playing music with his army buddy Billy Cox. By early '64, Hendrix left for New York City, and began struggling to make a name for himself in the big apple.

All the while, The Isley Brothers pay tribute to the great soul stars of the day and whip up a fury akin to the most outrageous fire and brimstone revival.

Around the same time, hendrix also played on the session for Don Covay's "Mercy Mercy"; while that's a fine record in its own right, I'm not featuring it here due to space restraints. It's best heard on the excellent Hendrix box set West Coast Seattle Boy.

These sides have been reissued in different mixes/ edits, but here's part one and two as they were originally released in 1964.

from 1964...

THE ISLEY BROTHERS - TESTIFY

In lesser hands than The Isley Brothers (with young Jimi Hendrix on guitar, no less) this track could have been a very pedestrian number that was downright forgettable. The song itself isn't much of anything, but in a way it's the precursor of James Brown's funk revolution that was brought on my the following year's "Papa's Got A Brand New Bag"; a rhythmic musical jam with lyrics that are more shouted/ chanted than sang. And other than JB himself, there was simply no one better at shouts than The Isleys, as they had been showing off since "Shout" back in 1959.

Plus, Hendrix plays some incredible, DRIVING guitar throughout; the definition of soulful, loose and fluid.

from 1964...

THE ISLEY BROTHERS - MOVE OVER AND LET ME DANCE

This record has been a holy grail of sorts for me since, oh, around 1990 when I first read about it in the book Jimi Hendrix: Electric Gypsy. In those days, of course, there was no internet so the possibilities of being able to hear this incredibly scarce record were close to impossible! Luckily, some time in the mid '90's I finally got to hear it, on a 5th or so generation cassette copy with tape hiss as loud as the music! Both sides lived up to and in fact, surpassed my expectations. It's a great record.

There are conflicting stories about authorship of "My Diary" (Arthur Lee is credited on the record, while Rosa Lee insists that she and Hendrix wrote the song) and also the year of recording (Rosa Lee claims 1964). The most likely story is that, in early 1965, young "Jimmy" Hendrix was on tour with Little Richard & The Upsetters when he decided to go AWOL in Los Angeles. Hendrix is said to have met Rosa Lee Brooks while they were both in the crowd at an Ike & Tina Turner show, and that night marked the beginning of a fleeting romance that lasted until Jimmy headed back to New York City. Rosa Lee knew Billy Revis, head of a small studio/ record label, who she and Hendrix persuaded to cut the single. Legend has it that when Rosa Lee picked up Arthur Lee to go to the recording session, Hendrix immediately became jealous and the situation became tense (the two reconnected a few years later without rivalry). Arthur's backing vocal is clearly heard on the record, and Hendrix lays down some of the greatest guitar work of his entire life on this track. The flip side, "Utee" was written in the studio and features a red hot Hendrix break. The record was announced in the Billboard Magazine in June of 1965, but other than a few rumblings in L.A, never went anywhere. Within a few months, Arthur Lee formed the group that, by the fall of 1965, became Love. Hendrix struggled along in New York for another year and some months until fate brought him into the lap of Animals bassist Chas Chandler, who took him to London and helped make him a star. Rosa Lee Brooks has kept on singing, but this seems to be her only release. And what a release it is! (note: both sides were issued on the excellent Hendrix box set West Coast Seattle Boy a few years back, but it doesn't diminish the thrill of owning and sharing the actual 45 one bit).

from 1965...

ROSA LEE BROOKS - MY DIARY

b/w UTEE

Every time I hear the intro to this great record, it reminds me of the flamboyant Little Richard interview in the 1973 Jimi Hendrix film where he claims that Jimi was ALREADY a star when he met him and was a member of Richard's band. As the luscious guitar intro proves, even though Jimi was playing in the Curtis Mayfield style at the time of this recording, he was a musician of grace, taste, finesse and a giant TALENT.

Allegedly Jimi's time with Richard was cut short due to the amount of attention Jimi was receiving on the bandstand which infuriated the star of the show, but fortunately he stuck around long enough to cut this one and only single.

For nearly five years (late '57 until 1962) Little Richard had left the sinners life of secular music, and became a preacher. It wasn't until an offer to tour England in '62 came on the table (thanks to Don Arden, villain of yesterday's post)that Richard made a return to his signature secular sounds.

This record shows off beautifully how well Richard can SING. Everyone knows that he can peel the paint off of the wall with the shouts, but damn does he put in a stellar vocal performance here.

from 1965...

LITTLE RICHARD - I DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU'VE GOT BUT IT'S GOT ME (parts 1 & 2)

File under "early Jimi Hendrix as session man". Jimi comes out blazing on the intro, and gets a chance to REALLY cut loose on side B.

Just like Hendrix moved east from Seattle to the Big Apple, vocalist and sax man Youngblood was transplanted into the bustling and cut-throat New York City music scene (he was born in Augusta, Georgia) and odds are the two met while playing with Curtis Knight & The Squires. Lonnie & Jimi obviously had a great chemistry that was demonstrated on this record (and their other one cut together, "Goodbye Bessie Mae", a past 45 of the day).

This record has erroneously been credited to 1963 many times, due to the "mistake" date on the label, common to so many Cameo-Parkway (and Motown) record labels.

from 1966...

LONNIE YOUNGBLOOD - GO GO SHOES

b/w GO GO PLACE

Before being "discovered" by Chas Chandler and the formation of the Experience in England and the massive success that followed, Jimi Hendrix lived in abject poverty and took whatever gigs and sessions he could. Stints with The Isley Brothers and Little Richard which resulted in sessions and tours were perhaps the most high profile, yet there was a string of other fabulous soul singles cut that took full advantage of the man's wizardry of the guitar.

This is one of the most obscure singles which feature Jimi, and what he does during the intro is 100% pure Hendrix. The recent West Coast Seattle Boy box set collects this and other gems (including the impossible to find Rosa Lee Brooks "My Diary" single, which is not only Jimi's first session but also featured a pre-Love Arthur Lee), however the version of this song used on the set is a completely different take!

Jimmy Norman found the most success of his career in writing the lyrics to the eternal "Time Is On My Side", and released a handful of singles on his own.

from 1966...

JIMMY NORMAN - THAT LITTLE OLD GROOVEMAKER

Basically taking "Like A Rolling Stone" and changing the lyrics to reflect civil rights protest, this would be a great record in it's own right. However, even more interesting is the small credit on the label; "arranged by Jimmy Hendrix". Yep, Hendrix himself before fame, and before swapping the extra "m" and "y" in his name to become Jimi.

Hendrix lays out some killer fuzz tone and plays some of the other great licks that he played on his own famous version of "Like A Rolling Stone" recorded a year and a half later at the Monterey Pop Festival.

Curtis Knight was the bandleader that Hendrix worked with quite a bit, and there are many recordings of him with Jimi which would be too complex for me to get into in this entry. I love Curtis' powerful lyrics and delivery on this track.

Sadly, the contract that begat this record also became a thorn in Hendrix side; he was still legally bound to producer Ed Chalpin (manager Chas Chandler bought up all of Hendrix previous contracts except this one, which slipped thru the cracks), causing great stress and legal litigation in Jimi's life, the end result of which was Hendrix having to hand over the Band Of Gypsys album to Chalpin for release on capitol records. This was after two shoddy albums were also released by Chalpin of the Knight/ Hendrix recordings to cash in on Jimi's name.

from 1966...

CURTIS KNIGHT - HOW WOULD YOU FEEL?

Ft Worth, Texas native Ray Sharpe took influences from rock n roll, country and r&b music and created music that was entirely unique. While his early singles (including the big hit "Linda Lu") could be classified as rockabilly, these records also could fall into the r&b classification. What's in a label anyhow? 

By the time of this release, Ray was working in New York City with the legendary King Curtis.

Producer/ sax man King Curtis must have truly loved this track, as he used it THREE times, this being the first appearance. In early '67, Ray Sharpe's vocal was removed, the track was sped up and new lyrics were added and it became Aretha Franklin's incredible "Save Me". Finally, in '68 King Curtis reworked the same basic track and turned it into "Instant Groove".

It's no surprise that Curtis loved the track, as it's a smoker- taking its cue from Them's "Gloria", the track is a masterpiece is smoldering dynamics. While the track starts off in full flight, through some subtle nuances the musicians keep turning up the heat until its a smoldering inferno of go-go goodness. None other than Jimi Hendrix is on guitar, as well. Hendrix is really given a chance to play on Part 2, although he plays a very subtle (yet still effective) break.

from 1966...

RAY SHARPE - HELP ME (PART 1 + 2)
 
A super cool double sider, made even more exciting by the presence of none other than Jimi Hendrix blazing on guitar during one of his earliest sessions.

Just like Hendrix, vocal and sax man Youngblood was transplanted into the bustling New York City music scene (he was born in Augusta, Georgia) and odds are the two met while playing with Curtis Knight & The Squires. Lonnie & Jimi obviously had a great chemistry that was demonstrated on this record (as well as on their other single together, "Go Go Shoes") and while Jimi only gets scant opportunities to cut loose, it's clear from Jimi's breaks on "Bessie Mae" that all the pieces were in place for Hendrix to turn the music world upside down only mere months after this record was cut.

This record has erroneously been credited to 1963 many times, due to the "mistake" date on the label, common to so many Cameo-Parkway (and Motown) record labels.

from 1966...

SOUL FOOD

b/w GOODBYE BESSIE MAE

Ooh dig that guitar on the opening...Who else could it be... None other than Jimi Hendrix! This track was recorded in New York City shortly before Jimi left for England and became a superstar.

Not much of a song here, per se, but it's a really hot slice of simmering early funk and Jimi's incredible guitar and the pounding drums make this one hot record.

from 1966...

BILLY LAMONT - SWEET THANG

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

October is the end of the road for Daily 45

I started The Daily 45 six years ago (I think it was April of 2007), and over those six years I've featured nearly 2000 45's. It's given me great pleasure to share these sounds with you, and I've made many friends around the world through it, and even connected with some of the artists, songwriters, musicians, and producers of the music who reached out because they were so pleased that someone still enjoyed what they did all those years ago. Very soul satisfying, if I do say so myself!

While there are still a few elusive 45's that are still on my want list (which I'll post up either here or on my youtube page as they come into my collection), I can say that I've featured practically everything I wanna share at this point. Sure, there's hundreds of great singles that have never been featured here, but those are high-profile releases that just about everybody knows anyhow because of their popularity and staying power; I've always steered clear of featuring those.

SO, for the month of October, I'm gonna highlight some of the big ones; namely, my all time favorite 45's, and also post up some artist profiles that will feature several favorite sides from them in one post.

I'd also love to hear from YOU! What are some of your favorites that have been featured? Tell me who you are and where you are, 'cause I'd love to share your words as well.

Although it's not QUITE goodbye at this time, I would like to thank each and every person who has written to thank me for doing this; your words helped me keep on, practically every day, for these last six years. It's been a helluva ride!

Here's some ways to keep in touch:

My youtube channel (subscribe to catch rare music I'll upload there in the future)

Derek See: Guitar, Vocal, DJ on Facebook




Monday, September 30, 2013

HONEY LOVE AND THE LOVE NOTES - WE BELONG TOGETHER

For some inexplicable reason, the final single on Cameo Records (before they moved to the Scepter label) by Philadelphia girl group Candy & The Kisses found them billed as Honey Love and The Love Notes. The song is gorgeous, and I almost wonder if part of the problem with this song not reaching its hit potential was the loss of momentum with a new name.

Candy & The Kisses, made up of sisters Candy & Suzanne Nelson along with friend Jeanette Johnson, seemed destined to break out nationally. Their single 'The 81" (a glorious former 45 of the day) was a smash in their hometown area (Philadelphia). They continued on releasing some more excellent singles for Scepter and Decca, but none of them reached any level of (deserved) success.

from 1965...

HONEY LOVE AND THE LOVE NOTES - WE BELONG TOGETHER

 

Sunday, September 29, 2013

CLARENCE REID - I'M SORRY BABY

Clarence Reid (misspelled as Ried here) was quite possibly THE most important figure on the Miami soul scene that blossomed in the late '60's and became massive throughout the '70's. Although he was very prolific as an artist himself (both on his own and later as Blowfly), Clarence saw far greater success as a brilliant songwriter (Betty Wright's "Clean Up Woman" being a shining example).

Clarence turns in a superb performance here that is wrought with emotion, and the expressive drumming pushes the song into a mini-masterpiece of souther soul.

from 1967...

CLARENCE REID - I'M SORRY BABY

Saturday, September 28, 2013

THE TRUTH - HEY GYP

One piece of info has surfaced about UK group Truth since I last featured a 45 from them back in 2009 (their cover of The Young Rascals "Sueno"); they were a vocal duo (with studio musician backing, most likely Jimmy Page on guitar) made up of Frank Aiello and Steve Jameson.

Here we find the group taking Donovan's amazing early composition "Hey Gyp" and turning it into a freakbeat rave up, dropping the parenthetical "(Dig The Slowness)" from Donovan's original. There's also an American raveup version of "Gyp" by The Soul Survivors that I featured here back in 2007, and The Truth's version predates it by about a year. I'm thinking that The Soul Survivors were definitely influenced by this (obscure) single.

from 1966...

THE TRUTH - HEY GYP




Thursday, September 26, 2013

PATTI DREW - HUNDREDS AND THOUSANDS OF GUYS


Ladies, are you having trouble with the fellas? Let Patti guide the way! This jam rates a SOLID 10 on the cool scale.

Both in her solo career and (earlier) as a member of The Drew-Vels, Patti Drew's lovely voice is heard on nearly two dozen singles before she left the music biz in 1971.

One obvious difference with the music business in the '60's was that labels gave many great artists time to grow and prosper; while Patti only had one major hit (1968's sublime "Workin' On A Groovy Thing') yet Capitol believed in her talent enough to keep her signed to the label for many years. Lucky for us! In my opinion, the downfall of the music industry was completely brought on by their about face which focused more on the quick buck and less on the longevity of artists.

from 1969...

PATTI DREW  - HUNDREDS AND THOUSANDS OF GUYS

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

LITTLE BOB - I CAN'T TAKE IT


(originally posted 6/24/11)

Little Bob (Camille Bob) has been active on the New Orleans music scene for over fifty years!

A few years back I featured his genius boozin' anthem "I Got Loaded", and I have been hot on the trail of this particular 45 for YEARS. Very tricky to find, but I recently scored a copy. It's a lovely rollicking summertime groove that showcases Bob's sweet vocals in the most raw, direct way possible. I love the stripped to the bone sound of this record, straight out of the basement.

from 1966...

LITTLE BOB - I CAN'T TAKE IT

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

CHRIS BERNARD - GOOD HEARTED WOMAN

Coming across like an even rawer Wilson Pickett, Chris Bernard apparently only had one shot to record. I can't find any evidence that he cut any other records. Johnny Cameron was a Chicago based producer, so it's safe to say this is a Chicago record- the band sure sounds like the Brunswick house band (who eventually became Pieces Of Peace) as well.

As was common for the funkier sounds that were developing (under the guidance of James Brown) at the time, the emphasis here is less on a song than the groove; and what a bad ass groove it is, punctuated by some raw emotion from the vocalist.

from 1968...

CHRIS BERNARD - GOOD HEARTED WOMAN


Monday, September 23, 2013

VIVIAN REED - THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

Vocalist/ actress Vivian Reed is known far more for her long time career as a Broadway performer (WHAT a voice!), and "The Shape Of Things To Come" is known more for the version by the faux-group Max Frost And The Troopers (as heard in the teen exploitation flick Wild In The Streets).

While the "Max Frost" version is lots of fun, Vivian's take allows the song to truly reach the potential of the lyrics without any irony or cornball factor. Considering the year that it was released (which was full of turmoil, unrest and horrifying assassinations), this version completely levels the original.

from 1968...

VIVIAN REED - THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

Sunday, September 22, 2013

ALL THE PEOPLE - WISH I HAD A GIRL LIKE YOU

From Miami, All The People released three 45's, lead singer Robert Moore a few solo sides, and also a few with a group called Miami. All of these records sank without a trace, although one of All The People's other 45's has been sampled several times.

I really dig the easy groovin' sound of this record, the lyrics are clever, and Robert Moore turns in an excellent vocal performance.

from 1972...

ALL THE PEOPLE - WISH I HAD A GIRL LIKE YOU


Friday, September 20, 2013

SIR DOUGLAS - SHE DIGS MY LOVE

Sir Douglas is (of course) the late, great Doug Sahm from Austin, TX. Doug was a musical melting pot who absorbed country music (he was a child prodigy musician), blues, rock n roll, soul, Tejano, and Tex Mex musics, sliced it all up and cooked up a career that was one of the most diverse in the history of music. I'm a massive fan of this man's music and spirit; his love of diversity in music AND people is a guiding light.

By 1967, the original Sir Douglas Quintet had broken up, thanks to an unfortunate pot bust in Texas; Most of the band was landlocked in Texas on probation, but Doug himself split for San Francisco; California became his home base for many years, and was the site for SDQ MK II (the group which scored their second massive hit, "Mendocino' in '68). The freakout guitar intro was undoubtedly influenced by Doug's new home in San Francisco, and the vocal is one of Doug's most upfront and raw.

As for THIS record, I'm guessing that Doug went back to Texas to record with Huey P Meaux one last time; although it's not a quintet record, Augie Meyer's unmistakable organ is present, and the two-step beat (ala "She's About A Mover") was probably also bashed out by Johnny Perez.

This song came on my ipod shuffle play, and I had all but forgotten how great it is; I had to double check my archives to make sure I didn't feature it at some point on this site. I thought I did, back in 2008 or so, but NOPE, it's making its debut here. This is a VERY scarce record, and even though it hardly ever turns up, it's usually quite inexpensive when it does.

from 1967...

SIR DOUGLAS - SHE DIGS MY LOVE

Thursday, September 19, 2013

LITTLE ARCHIE - ALL I HAVE TO DO

Entering into SERIOUS soul stomping territory with this jam...

Little Archie (Himons) only cut two 45's, but his life in music extends far beyond that; he began as a drummer while still a teenager, and eventually made his way to the attention of Dial Records chief Buddy Killen, who saw his potential as a lead singer. Not only did Archie show off a husky vocal style, but he wrote the track as well. Archie has lived around the world, started reggae and blues bands, busked, and apparently now performs acoustic soul in West Virginia (which I'd love to hear).

It's a sad realization at this point to realize that I've just about exhausted all of the records from this era in this style; there's still a FEW wants on my list, but at this point I've just about filled every gap in my collection of records in this style (which happens to be a real favorite kind of sound). Sure, there's more out there, but some of them I could never afford or they just don't move me personally, for whatever reason. It sure has been fun sharing them here, though!

from 1967...

LITTLE ARCHIE - ALL I HAVE TO DO